Using the Cities.jmp sample data table, specify a Sizes variable to see a treemap of city sizes based on population.
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select POP (population) and click Sizes.
4.
Select city and click Categories.
5.
POP as Sizes Variable
For example, using the Cities.jmp sample data table, specify an Ordering variable as follows:
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select city and click Categories.
4.
Select POP (population) and click Ordering.
5.
The report window appears. Since you specified an Ordering variable, the cities in the treemap are ordered from bottom left (small cities) to upper right (big cities).
POP as Ordering Variable
For example, in the Cities.jmp sample data table, the X and Y columns correspond to the geographic location of the cities. Specify the X and Y columns as Ordering variables:
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select city and click Categories.
4.
Select X and click Ordering.
The X variable corresponds to the western and eastern US states.
5.
Select Y and click Ordering.
The Y variable corresponds to the northern and southern US states.
6.
Treemap with Two Ordering Variables
For example, using the Cities.jmp sample data table, specify a continuous Coloring variable as follows:
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select city and click Categories.
4.
Select OZONE and click Coloring.
5.
City Colored by OZONE
Note that the size of the rectangles is still based on the number of occurrences of the Categories variable, but the colors are mapped to ozone values. The high ozone value for Los Angeles clearly stands out. Missing values appear as black rectangles.
For example, using the Cities.jmp sample data table, specify a categorical Coloring variable as follows:
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select city and click Categories.
4.
Select Region and click Coloring.
5.
City Colored by Region
Using the Cities.jmp sample data table, examine the distribution of different pollution measurements (ozone and lead) across selected cities in the United States.
1.
Open the Cities.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select POP (population) and click Sizes.
4.
Select city and click Categories.
5.
Select X and Y and click Ordering.
6.
Select OZONE and click Coloring.
7.
OZONE Levels for Selected Cities
From OZONE Levels for Selected Cities, you observe the following:
Lead Levels for Selected Cities
From Lead Levels for Selected Cities, you observe the following:
This example uses the Failure3.jmp sample data table, which contains the common causes of failure during the fabrication of integrated circuits. Examine the causes of failure and when it occurs.
1.
Open the Failure3.jmp sample data table, located in the Quality Control folder.
2.
Select Graph > Treemap.
3.
Select N and click Sizes.
4.
Select failure and clean and click Categories.
5.
Select clean and click Coloring.
6.
Failure Modes
From Failure Modes, you observe the following:
This example uses the Cars.jmp sample data table, which contains impact measurements of crash-test dummies in automobile safety tests. Compare these measurements for different automobile makes and models during the years 1990 and 1991.
1.
Open the Cars.jmp sample data table.
2.
Select Rows > Data Filter.
3.
Select Year.
4.
Click Add.
6.
Select Tables > Subset.
7.
Ensure that Selected Rows is selected and click OK.
1.
Select Graph > Treemap.
2.
Select Wt (weight) and click Sizes.
3.
Select Make and Model and click Categories.
4.
Select L Leg and click Coloring.
L Leg represents a measurement of injuries resulting from the deceleration speed of the left leg, where more deceleration causes more injury.
5.
Left Leg Deceleration Injuries
From Left Leg Deceleration Injuries, you can see that the Club Wagon and S10 Pickup 4x4 have the largest number of left leg deceleration injuries.
1.
2.
Select Head IC.
3.
Head Injuries
From Head Injuries, you notice the following: