Publication date: 08/13/2020

Specify Colors

The following commands control colors:

Fill Color() for solid areas

Level Color() for categorical data

Pen Color() for lines and points

Back Color() for the background of text (similar to the box around the erased text in Figure 12.19)

Background Color() for the graph’s background color

Font Color() for added text

Fill colors overwrite pen colors for drawn shapes. You do not get both, as in some drawing packages. To get both a fill and a pen line, draw two shapes, one with fill and one without. You can select a color with a single numeric argument, a color name in quotation marks, or an RGB value. The standard colors are specified with numbers 0–15 (both 0 and 15 are black) or by their names (Table 12.1).

Tip: For more shades, add the word Dark, Medium Dark, Medium Light, or Light before a color name in quotation marks.

Table 12.1 Standard JMP Colors

Number

Name

0

Black

1

Gray

2

White

3

Red

4

Green

5

Blue

6

Orange

7

BlueGreen

8

Purple

9

Yellow

10

Cyan

11

Magenta

12

YellowGreen

13

BlueCyan

14

Fuchsia

The following script creates a graph that shows all JMP colors:

Text Color( 0 );
New Window( "Colors",
	Graph Box(
		FrameSize( 640, 400 ),
		Y Scale( -1, 17 ),
		X Scale( -3, 12 ),
		k = 0;
		For( jj = 1, jj <= 12, jj += 2,
			l = 15;
			For( i = 0, i <= 15 & k < 85, i++,
				thiscolor = Color To RGB( k );
				Fill Color( k );
				thisfill = 1;
				If( thiscolor == {1, 1, 1},
					Pen Color( 0 );
					thisfill = 0;
				,
					Pen Color( k )
				);
				Rect( jj, l + .5, jj + .5, l, thisfill );
				Text( {jj - 1, l}, "color ", k );
				k++;
				l--;
			);
		);
		jj = -2;
		color = {"Black", "Gray", "White", "Red", "Green", "Blue", "Orange", "BlueGreen",
		"Purple", "Yellow", "Cyan", "Magenta", "YellowGreen", "BlueCyan", "Fuschia", "Black"};
		For(
			i = 0;
			l = 15;, i <= 15 & l >= 0,
			i++;
			l--;,
			Text( {jj, l}, color[i + 1] )
		);
	) );
 

Larger numbers cycle through shading variations of the same color sequence. A script demonstrating this appears under Colors and Markers in the Data Tables section. Values outside the range 0–84 are not accepted.

Table 12.2 How Numbers Map to Colors

Number

Result

16–31

Medium Dark

32–47

Medium Light

48–63

Dark

64–79

Light

80–84

Light, Medium Light, Gray, Medium Dark, Dark

If you prefer to use RGB values, create a list with the fraction for each color in red, green, and blue order.

Pen Color( {.38,.84,.67} ); // teal

RGB Color() and Color to RGB() convert color values between JMP color numbers and the red-green-blue system. The following example finds the RGB values for JMP color 3 (red):

Color to RGB( 3 );

{0.941176470588235, 0.196078431372549, 0.274509803921569}

Likewise, HLS Color() and Color to HLS() convert color values between JMP color numbers and the hue-lightness-saturation system.

win = New Window( "Color Wheel",
	Graph(
		Frame Size( 200, 200 ),
		For( hue = 0, hue < 360, hue += 30,
			y = 50 - 40 * Cos( hue * 2 * Pi() / 360 );
			x = 50 + 40 * Sin( hue * 2 * Pi() / 360 );
			Fill Color( HLS Color( hue / 360, 0.5, 1 ) );
			Oval( x - 10, y - 10, x + 10, y + 10, 1 );
		)
	)
);

Finally, Heat Color() returns the JMP color that corresponds to a value in any color theme that is supported by Cell Plot, Treemap, and so on. The syntax is:

Heat Color( n, <<"theme" )

The theme message is optional, and the default value is "Blue to Gray to Red". You can specify any color theme, including custom color themes. You can also create and use an anonymous color theme as shown in the following examples:

Heat Color( z, <<{"", {{1, 1, 0}, {0, 0, 1}} } );
Heat Color( z, <<{"", {blue, green, yellow} } )
Want more information? Have questions? Get answers in the JMP User Community (community.jmp.com).
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